CHAMPOLLION TRANSLATIONS

Affordable Spanish-English translations
with rapid turn-around time

Armand A. Gagnon, M.A.
Experienced, certified professional translator with reasonable rates

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email: linguist29@comcast.net

DON'T BE FOOLED BY ELECTRONIC TRANSLATORS OR FREE TRANSLATION SOFTWARE


Please feel free to e-mail me or,
 if you prefer, I can call you.

Certified courtroom interpreter, County of Ventura, California
Bilingual Examiner & Translator, Lane County, Eugene, Oregon


Spanish Instructor, Lane Community College, Eugene, Oregon
combining the Silent Way & the Conceptual/Structural Approach

Group Rates for Private Industry Spanish classes

    Jean François Champollion (1790-1832), decryptor of Egyptian hieroglyphics or "sacred carvings" and translator of the Rosetta stone, which was uncovered by a French soldier under Napoléan's command in 1799 in the Nile Delta town of Rashid, Egypt. On the stone were inscribed the archaïc language of Ancient Egyptian, Greek, and Demotic. His main work was the Summary of the Hieroglyphic System of Ancient Egyptians.

     Unlike Egyptian hieroglyphs, cuneiform (from the Latin cuneus for “wedge”) was not a single system of writing representing just one language – it was used for numerous languages for over three thousand years and varied from one language to the next. 
   
Sir Henry Creswicke Rawlinson (1810-95), British officer in service with the Persian army and consul of Baghdad, had some understanding of Sanskrit, Latin, Greek, and Avestan (Old Persian). In 1827, he traveled to India as cadet with the East India Company and became the first person to decipher successfully cuneiform tablets found there.

His major work was entitled A Commentary on the Cuneiform Inscriptions of Babylon and Assyria.

ONE OF THE GREATEST MISTRANSLATIONS OF ALL TIME:
Back in 1877, Italian astronomer Giovanni Schiaparelli had observed the planet Mars through his modest 19th Century telescope and in his astronomy book, mentioned the "channels" (dried waterbeds) on the surface of the red planet. In his native Italian, "channels" is canali. When the wealthy Bostonian amateur astronomer Percival Lowell read a translation of Schiaparelli's book and canali was translated as "canals" in English (implying a network on Mars created by intelligent beings), a life-on-Mars mania and madness then ensued well into the 20th Century. Beginning with H.G Wells' 1898 science fiction novel War of the Worlds, this frenzy was followed by Edgar Rice Burroughs' tales of John Carter and his living "thoats" on Mars. Orson Welles' 1938 radio broadcast of the now famous H.G. Wells novel only served to reïnforce this craze. To this day, many non-scientific believers still think that canals actually exist on Mars, all due to this outlandish mistranslation!

Methodologies in Foreign Language Teaching

Armand A. Gagnon on UNIVERSATILE LANGUAGE

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